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Recent FW decision in a digitally connected age

Nov 28, 2023


  • 2min

Recent FW decision in a digitally connected age

Industry News, Legislative Changes, Talent Operations
A person using their work laptop for personal browsing in a digitally connected age
In today’s digitally connected era, the line between personal and professional life has become increasingly blurred. The recent case of a lawyer being unfairly terminated for personal internet browsing during work hours sheds light on the challenges employers face in addressing this crossover.

This incident highlights the importance of establishing clear guidelines and procedures to balance an employee’s personal activities and professional responsibilities.

three men sit over a work table using a laptop and a personal phone.
We are more connected than ever, our business policies need to be adaptable.

Understanding the Modern Workplace Dynamics

In the age of remote work and constant connectivity, team members often find themselves juggling personal and work-related tasks. Employers need to recognise this reality and adapt their policies to accommodate the evolving nature of the workplace. The lawyer’s case underscores the need for a nuanced approach that considers the challenges of the modern work environment.

Performance Concerns and Remote Work Issues

The lawyer’s situation included concerns about both performance and unauthorised remote work. Employers must proactively address performance issues and set expectations for remote work to avoid misunderstandings. Regular performance evaluations, open communication, and clearly defined remote work policies can help mitigate such issues.

The Dilemma of Personal Internet Browsing

The lawyer’s seven-hour personal internet browsing over four days raised questions about the acceptable boundaries of personal activities during work hours. While employers have a legitimate interest in maintaining productivity, it is crucial to establish realistic expectations and communicate them clearly to team members. Striking a balance between personal freedom and professional responsibilities is key to fostering a healthy work environment.

Procedural Deficiencies in Termination

The Fair Work Commission’s ruling emphasised the procedural deficiencies in the lawyer’s termination. Employers should ensure that any disciplinary actions, including terminations, follow a fair and transparent process. This includes notifying team members of specific concerns, providing them with an opportunity to respond, and considering the overall context of their performance.

Recommendations for Employers

Clear Communication

Clearly communicate expectations regarding personal internet usage during work hours. Establish guidelines that distinguish acceptable from unacceptable behaviour.

Regular Performance Reviews

Conduct regular performance reviews to address concerns promptly and provide constructive feedback. This allows team members to understand expectations and improve their performance.

Remote Work Policies

Clearly define remote work policies, outlining when and how team members can work remotely. Address concerns about unauthorised remote work through open communication and collaboration.

Fair Disciplinary Process

Follow a fair and transparent disciplinary process when faced with performance issues. Notify team members of specific concerns, allow them to respond, and consider the overall context of their performance.

Training and Awareness

Provide training to team members on acceptable internet usage and the company’s policies. Foster awareness of the impact personal activities can have on overall productivity.

As the digital landscape continues to shape how we work, employers must adapt their policies and procedures to address the challenges posed by personal and work internet browsing crossover. Striking a balance between personal freedom and professional responsibilities and fair and transparent processes is essential for maintaining a productive and harmonious workplace. By navigating these boundaries thoughtfully, employers can foster a positive work environment that encourages accountability and employee well-being.

Our team can help you create and manage your own policies and procedures. Call us on 1800 868 254 or set up a meeting to discuss how we can help you.

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Tips for Retaining Your Team Over the Christmas Break

Nov 28, 2023


  • 2min

Tips for Retaining Your Team Over the Christmas Break

Employer Brand, Recruiter Tips, Recruiting Metrics
Two people in suits meeting with their team, after using tips for retaining your team over christmas break
The holiday season is upon us, and while it’s a time for joy and celebration, it can also be a challenging period for employers concerned about retaining their team members.

It’s not uncommon for team members to return from the Christmas break with a fresh perspective and new resolutions, which sometimes include contemplating a change in their professional lives.

Here are some friendly and approachable tips for retaining your team over the Christmas break to help you keep your team intact and motivated in the coming year.

Woman with Christmas nails returning to work after Christmas break
Your team is your business’ biggest asset. Ensure you are proactive in their return to work.

1. Organise Feedback and Reviews Before the Break

Before everyone heads off for their well-deserved break, take the time to provide constructive feedback and conduct performance reviews. This not only gives employees a clear understanding of their strengths and areas for improvement but also shows that you value their contributions. It sets a positive tone for the new year, making employees feel acknowledged and motivated to continue their hard work.

2. Address Remuneration Reviews Transparently

Salary and compensation are significant factors that influence an employee’s job satisfaction. If you’ve promised a remuneration review, ensure it happens before the Christmas break. If adjustments are made, communicate them transparently, explaining the rationale behind the decisions. Demonstrating a commitment to fair compensation goes a long way in fostering trust and loyalty among your staff.

3. Follow Through on Year-End Commitments

If there were projects, promotions, or other commitments promised to be completed by the end of the year, make sure you follow through. Employees may feel disheartened if assurances are left unfulfilled. By delivering on your promises, you reinforce a culture of accountability and reliability, reassuring your team that their efforts are valued and respected.

4. Communicate a Vision for the Upcoming Year

As the year comes to a close, share your vision for the upcoming year with your team. Discuss exciting projects, potential opportunities for growth, and any changes in the company’s direction. Creating a sense of anticipation can boost morale and keep employees engaged during the break. When they return, they’ll be excited to be part of the business plan you’ve outlined.

5. Encourage a Positive Work-Life Balance

While the holidays are a time for relaxation and rejuvenation, they’re also an opportunity to reflect on work-life balance. Encourage your employees to take a break, recharge, and spend quality time with loved ones. A healthy work-life balance contributes to job satisfaction and, in turn, reduces the likelihood of post-holiday resignations.

By proactively addressing these points, you not only create a positive work environment but also increase the likelihood of retaining your valuable team members. The key is to show appreciation, provide clarity, and set the stage for a successful and fulfilling new year.

Contact our team to plan your business needs in 2024 on 1800 868 254 or set up a meeting.

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Fixed term contracts change

Nov 13, 2023


  • 2min

Fixed term contracts change

Industry News, Legislative Changes
Fixed term contract changes are coming into effect on 6 December 2023. The new rules focus on information transparency and time limitations on how fixed term contracts work. The changes aim to phase out fixed term contracts that should be part-time or full-time employment contracts.

The rules, or limitations, that are coming into effect focus on how long a fixed term contract can be, renewing a fixed term contract and how many times it can be renewed, and employing a person on consecutive contracts.

man in flannel shirt and cargo pants overlooks a field being ploughed by a red tractor
Fixed term contracts are commonly used in agriculture, transport, and seasonal work industries.
The changes also include the legal requirement for employers to provide team members with a Fixed Term Contract Information Statement (FTCIS) if they are engaged on a fixed term contract.
Time limitations:
  • A fixed term contract can’t be for longer than two years, including extensions and renewals.
  • Fixed term contracts can’t have an option to extend or renew the contract so that the employment period is longer than two years.
  • They cannot be extended or renewed more than once.

There are also rules surrounding consecutive contract limitations that reinforce the new rules. An employer cannot employ someone on a fixed term contract if the new contract is for the same work as a previous one. A substantial break in the employment relationship must exist before signing a new fixed term contract.

The new time limitation rules also apply to consecutive contracts; the employer cannot employ someone if the total period of employment for the previous and new fixed term contracts is more than two years or if the new fixed term contract can be extended or renewed.

The changes also include the legal requirement for employers to provide team members with a Fixed Term Contract Information Statement (FTCIS) if they are engaged on a fixed term contract.

The new limitations make keeping team members on ongoing fixed term contracts harder. Fixed term contracts are not a replacement for part-time or full-time employment contracts.

As with most employment updates, there are exceptions to all of these rules. Exceptions include specialised skills,  training arrangements, essential work, emergency circumstances or temporary absences, high income team members, government funded contracts, governance positions and if there are any award provisions for fixed term contracts.

You can visit the Fair Work Ombudsman for more information. They also have a breakdown of the changes with examples.

If you need help creating new employment contracts, please contact our HR experts on 1800 868 254 or email us at info@totalhrm.com.au.

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Positive duty to eliminate unlawful acts

Oct 31, 2023


  • 2min

Positive duty to eliminate unlawful acts

Industry News, Legislative Changes
man in check suit jacket corners a woman in a green shirt against a glass wall. She is uncomfortable with her arms crossed.
Since the revised Sex Discrimination Act came into effect at the end of 2022, employers have a positive duty to eliminate unlawful acts. The unlawful acts includes discrimination on the grounds of sex in a work context, sexual harassment in connection with work, sex-based harassment in connection with work, and conduct creating a workplace environment that is hostile on the grounds of sex and related acts of victimisation. 

The goal of these changes is to help create safe, respectful, and inclusive workplaces for all. There is now a legal obligation placed on organisations and businesses to take proactive and preventative steps to stop unlawful conduct from occurring in the workplace or in connection to work.  

woman sits at an desk with her phone, laptop and diary. A male colleague is standing over her shoulders, with one hand resting on her shoulder.
Businesses and organisations must be proactively eliminating unlawful acts in the workplace.
The changes effect organisations and businesses across Australia, regardless of their size or industry. The major difference is on prevention, instead of addressing it only after an incident has occurred.  

From December 2023, the Australian Human Rights Commission (AHRC) will have new powers to investigate and enforce the positive duty.  

Respect@Work outlines the wide range of different behaviours that are considered to be sexual harassment, including:  

  • inappropriate physical contact 
  • intrusive questions about a person’s private life or physical appearance 
  • sharing or threatening to share intimate images or video without consent 
  • images or videos that are sexually suggestive or that constitute a sexual advance 
  • unwelcome touching, hugging, cornering or kissing 
  • repeated or inappropriate invitations to go out on dates 
  • sexually suggestive comments or jokes that offend or intimidate 
  • requests or pressure for sex or other sexual acts 
  • sexually explicit gifts, images, videos, cartoons, drawings, photographs, or jokes. 
  • actual or attempted rape or sexual assault 
  • following or watching someone inappropriately, or someone loitering inappropriately, either in person or via technology 
  • sexually explicit comments made in person or in writing, or indecent messages (SMS, social media), phone calls or emails—including the use of emojis with sexual connotations 
  • sexual gestures, indecent exposure or inappropriate display of the body 
  • technology-facilitated unwelcome conduct of a sexual nature—including on virtual meetings 
  • inappropriate staring or leering 
  • repeated or inappropriate advances on email or other online social technologies. 
The AHRC has published comprehensive guidelines to help businesses to understand what positive duty is, who must meet the positive duty, how positive duty will be enforced and other related legal obligations. 

They also have a Resource for Small Businesses on the Positive Duty to help small businesses to satisfy their obligations to prevent sexual harassment in the workplace.  

If you feel unsafe now, please call 000. For a full list of support services, visit AHRC Support Services.

If you are in NSW and need support, you can call Domestic Violence Line Department of Community Services: 1800 656 463 (24 hours)

In Victoria you can contact Sexual Assault Crisis Line Crisis Line: 1800 806 292 (free call).

If you need to implement workplace policy to ensure you are complying with legislation, or if you have a workplace related question, please contact our team of HR experts on 1800 868 254. Total HRM can help you create or adapt your existing policies.

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Christmas is coming – what are the leave rules? 2023 update

Oct 30, 2023


  • 2min

Christmas is coming – what are the leave rules? 2023 update

Industry News
Sarah and Beck sit back to back on against a white wall. They are laughing and looking at each other. Sarah has cartoon reindeer antlers on her head. Beck has a cartoon santa hat, both of which have been edited on.
With the Christmas holiday period quickly approaching, now is the time to start planning your holiday operating hours and ensuring you’ve got appropriate coverage if you have employees requesting leave.

The holiday season is an important time for many people to spend time with their family and friends to relax and recharge for the year ahead. It’s also a busy time for many businesses, especially those in retail and hospitality, so balancing your business’s needs with your team’s needs can be challenging but not impossible.

What are the new rules in 2023 – let’s break it down

Kim & Dave in enjoying the Christmas (Photoshop) Spirit.

Shutdown period over Christmas and New Year

If you’re planning on closing during the Christmas and New Year period and your employees are covered under an award, you’ll need to check the relevant rules for that award to ensure compliance.

In May of this year, rules around shutdown periods for 77 awards (including building and construction, hospitality, hair and beauty, and real estate) changed, and you can only direct an employee to take leave during shutdown periods if their award or registered agreement allows it.

One key change is that employers must give 28 days’ notice of the shutdown period unless an agreement for a shorter notice period has been reached with the majority of affected employees.

A few other things to keep in mind

  • Shutdown period notice must be in writing.
  • The direction for taking leave must be reasonable.
  • You can’t direct employees to take unpaid leave during a shutdown – employees can use time in lieu and employees without enough paid leave available can be granted paid leave in advance.
  • Employees will be paid for any public holidays during the shutdown period that would otherwise be a normal working day.

No shutdown period over Christmas and New Year

If your business won’t be closing over the holiday period, your employees may request to take annual leave during this time. Employees will need to request leave in advance in accordance with their award, registered agreement, company policy or employment contract.

It’s important to remember that an employer can only refuse an employee’s request for leave if the refusal is reasonable. 

Cancelling a leave request

Similar to refusing an employee’s leave request, an employer’s cancellation of approved leave must be reasonable. You’ll also need to consider whether the employee has incurred any expenses concerning the leave request and how much notice you’re giving the employee. 

Likewise, if the employee wishes to cancel an approved leave request, the employer shouldn’t unreasonably refuse the request.

Have a stress-free holiday season

Workforce planning around the holidays can be tricky. You may have multiple employees who want to take the same period off, making it challenging to create rosters and ensure you’ve got appropriate coverage. 

Reducing stress during this time of the year comes down to being reasonable, good communication and robust employment policies. Communicate with your employees early about the business’ needs and expectations during the busy Christmas and New Year period. If you don’t shut down during this time, ensure your company policies and employment contracts set out how leave requests are managed during high-demand periods.

If you need any help with preparing your business for the holiday season or would like to find out more about our successful recruitment campaigns, call our HR experts on 1800 868 254 or talk to an expert.

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Top Five Mistakes in Recruitment and How to Avoid Them

Oct 02, 2023


  • 2min

Top Five Mistakes in Recruitment and How to Avoid Them

Candidate Sourcing
photograph of five people standing against a grey wall from their chest down. You cannot see their heads. They are all wearing business attire.
Recruiting the right people is key for any business to succeed. However, there are common mistakes that many businesses make that can negatively impact their recruitment process. Here are the top five recruitment mistakes to avoid:
  1. Only focusing on technical skills:
    Technical skills are the tools of the trade and are often what most job descriptions focus on. Depending on your industry, these skills can range from programming and computer coding for building a website, using specific accounting or project management software, knowledge about specific legislation or other government regulations, or the ability and formal training required to use a particular type of heavy machinery.

    These skills are essential but are only part of the puzzle. It’s equally important that your new team member fits in with your organisation and has the soft skills required to succeed in the role.

    How to avoid it: Don’t forget the soft skills
    Yes, technical skills are important for any job but don’t forget to assess a candidate’s soft skills, such as communication, teamwork, and problem-solving. These skills can make a big difference in how well a candidate fits with the team and business and, ultimately, how successful they are in their role. 

    Soft skills are transferable from job to job, so consider what other roles the candidate has on their resume that would require similar soft skills and then discuss during the interview how they would apply them in a new context.
A simple five step infographic displaying the top five recruitment mistakes.
Recruiting the right people is key for any business to succeed. However, there are common mistakes that many businesses make that can negatively impact their recruitment process.

  1. Rushing the hiring process
    Don’t get too caught up in trying to fill a position quickly. Rushing the hiring process can lead to missed opportunities to evaluate a candidate’s fit for the role and the business culture. Taking the time to reevaluate a recently vacated role also makes good business sense. When was the last time this role was available, and how has your business or team changed since then?

    How to avoid it: Have a strategic recruitment plan in place

    It’s important to take the time to plan out the recruitment process, from defining the job requirements to developing a thorough interview process. This also gives you time to properly evaluate the position to determine if any changes need to be made to your team’s structure or what the role will require.

    If there are tasks that can be delegated to give other team members stretch opportunities, you may find that the role you need to hire for is very different from what you thought it would be.

  2. Neglecting diversity and inclusion
    Diversity and inclusion are essential considerations when recruiting new team members. Neglecting this can lead to a smaller talent pool and a team that lacks different perspectives and experiences. Being an inclusive employer could mean you take a proactive role in developing a wheelchair-friendly workplace or being flexible with scheduling to accommodate staff with caring responsibilities who may need to work different hours.

    How to avoid it: Develop hiring practices that remove biases against certain groups of candidates
    It’s important to actively seek out diverse candidates and make sure your recruitment process is free of potential biases. This starts at the strategic level and can be built into your brand ethos. When it comes time to advertise a new role, think about where you are advertising it to attract a wider group of potential candidates and think about how you can remove bias from your resume screening process.

  3. Poor communication with candidates
    When you’re recruiting for multiple roles and have a stack of resumes on your desk, it can be easy to overlook the importance of good communication. A lack of communication can lead to a poor candidate experience and can damage the business’s reputation in the long run. If the candidate feels the experience was too poor, they may even decline your offer of employment.

    How to avoid it: Keep candidates in the loop throughout the recruitment process
    Provide regular updates on the status of their application and give feedback after interviews. Frequent communication can help ensure candidates don’t go to your competitor, especially in a market scarce in talent.

    Find ways to automate this process where possible while keeping in mind the importance of maintaining a personal touch – you don’t want to sound like a robot.

  4. Not checking references or performing background checks
    Checking references is a crucial step in the recruitment process. Don’t skip this step. References can provide valuable insight into a candidate’s work habits and performance, which can help you make a more informed hiring decision. Depending on your industry, it can be crucial to perform police or drug and alcohol checks to ensure your team member’s suitability for their position.

    How to avoid: Be upfront in the recruitment process about reference checks and how they will work

    If you require reference checks, then make this known early on in the recruitment process. This will give candidates the time they need to contact the appropriate people and get their information together. Conduct at least two reference checks, preferably from people the candidate has reported to. If the role requires police or working with children checks, let the candidate know that even if they don’t have those clearances currently, they can be obtained if needed.

Recruitment is an important process for any business, and avoiding these common mistakes can help make it more successful. Remember to assess a candidate’s soft skills in addition to their technical skills, take the time to plan out the recruitment process, prioritize diversity and inclusion, communicate effectively with candidates, and always check references. By doing so, you can increase your chances of finding the right fit for your business and building a strong, productive team.

If you’d like to find out more about our successful recruitment campaigns, call our HR experts on 1800 868 254 or talk to an expert.

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7 key benefits of a great induction

Sep 15, 2023


  • 2min

7 key benefits of a great induction

Candidate Sourcing, Employer Brand, Recruiter Tips
Three people sitting around a table with laptops. There are colourful squares on the wall behind them.
A good new team member induction process can be hugely beneficial to any business. Here are seven key benefits of a great induction process:
  1. Faster integration: A good induction process can help new team members integrate more quickly into the business. They can learn about the business’s culture, values, and expectations, as well as the roles and responsibilities of their new position. This can help them feel more comfortable and confident in their new role, which in turn can lead to greater productivity sooner.
Three professional women sit around a cafe table with coffees, with one silver laptop between them. They are smiling and laughing looking at each other.
A good induction process can make a big difference to your team members.
  1. Improved retention:
    A good induction process can also help improve retention rates. When new team members feel welcome and supported, they are more likely to stay with the business for the long term. This can help reduce turnover, which can be costly and disruptive for businesses.

  2. Better understanding of business processes:
    A good induction process can help new team members understand the processes and procedures that are essential to the business’s success. They can learn about the business’s goals and objectives, as well as the steps that are necessary to achieve them as they relate to their job function.   

  3. Enhanced communication:
    A good induction process can also enhance communication between new team members and existing team members. By providing opportunities for new team members to ask questions and interact with others, the business can foster an environment of open communication and collaboration.

  4. Improved performance:
    A good induction process can also lead to improved performance from new team members. By providing them with the knowledge and tools they need to succeed, the business can set them up for success and help them reach their full potential.

  5. Greater engagement:
    A good induction process can also help new team members feel more engaged with the business. When they understand the business’s mission and values, and feel connected to their role and the broader team, they are more likely to be committed to their work and motivated to succeed.

  6. Positive brand image:
    A good induction process can help create a positive brand image for the business. When new team members feel supported and valued, they are more likely to share their positive experiences with others. This can help attract new talent to the business and enhance its reputation in the industry. This is especially important in the current market where great talent is scarce.

So, in essence, a good new team member induction process can bring numerous benefits to any business. From faster integration and improved retention to enhanced communication and engagement, it can set new team members up for success and help them feel welcomed and supported within the business. Additionally, it can improve overall performance and contribute to a positive brand image for the business.

If you need any HR advice or help with your HR documentation, please call us on 1800 868 254 or email your questions to info@totalhrm.com.au.

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The benefits of workplace flexibility

Sep 05, 2023


  • 2min

The benefits of workplace flexibility

Industry News, Recruiter Tips
Dave in the foreground on a duel screen computer set up in Total HRM office, with Caitlin and Felicity in the background working on the computers. Dave wears a red checkered shirt, Caitlin wears a black and white striped shirt. Workplace flexibility allows the team to work when they can.
In recent years, flexibility in the workplace has become increasingly important for both businesses and team members. Workplace flexibility refers to the ability of team members to work outside traditional hours and locations, such as working from home or adjusting their work hours to accommodate personal commitments. Below, we list the benefits of workplace flexibility and some options for you to incorporate flexibility into your workplace.

Here are some of the key reasons why offering team members flexibility in the workplace is beneficial:

  1. Improved work-life balance: 
    Offering flexibility in the workplace can help team members achieve a better work-life balance. It allows them to better manage their personal and professional commitments, which can help reduce stress and improve overall well-being.
A woman sits at home desk in front of a monitor with various windows open using the benefits of workplace flexibility.  The desk has a lamp, pot plant and a digital clock, with three photos of landscape and a white horse hung on the wall.
Working from home or WFH has remained popular since the pandemic.
  1. Increased productivity: 
    Research has shown that team members with flexibility in the workplace are often more productive. They are able to work within timeframes when they are most productive and can avoid distractions that may be present in a traditional office environment.

  2. Greater job satisfaction:
    Team members with workplace flexibility often have greater job satisfaction. When they feel trusted and valued by the business, they are more likely to be satisfied with their role and to stay with the business longer.

  3. Attract and retain top talent: 
    In today’s competitive job market, offering flexibility in the workplace is a ‘must’ to help businesses attract and retain top talent. Many team members place a high value on work-life balance and flexibility and may choose to work for a business that offers these benefits over one that does not.

  4. Cost savings: 
    Offering flexibility in the workplace can also lead to cost savings for businesses. By allowing team members to work from home, businesses can reduce the need for office space and associated costs, such as utilities and office supplies.
Offering team members flexibility in the workplace can bring numerous benefits to the team and the business. It can improve work-life balance, increase productivity, enhance job satisfaction, attract and retain top talent, and lead to cost savings. By prioritising flexibility, businesses can create a culture that values team members’ well-being and success, leading to long-term success for the business.

Now we understand the benefits of workplace flexibility, here are seven ways that you can offer workplace flexibility to your team:

  1. Flexible work hours: 
    Offering flexible work hours can be a great way to accommodate team members’ personal commitments. For example, allowing team members to start and finish work earlier or later than usual can help them manage childcare or other responsibilities.

  1. Remote work: 
    Allowing team members to work remotely, either full-time or part-time, can be a great way to provide flexibility in the workplace. It can be particularly useful for team members who live far away from the office or have other commitments that make it challenging to come into the office. It may also allow you to tap into a remote workforce, especially when good talent is scarce.

  2. Job sharing: 
    Job sharing involves splitting one full-time role between two or more team members. Job sharing can be a great way to provide flexibility while ensuring the work gets done.

  3. Reduced hours:
    Offering team members the option to work reduced hours can be a great way to provide flexibility. It could mean working part-time or reducing the hours worked per week.

  4. Compressed workweek: 
    A compressed workweek involves working longer hours over fewer days. For example, a team member could work four 10-hour days instead of five 8-hour days. You should check the appropriate Award to ensure you are not paying overtime rates.

  5. Flexibility around leave: 
    Offering flexibility around leave can be a great way to accommodate team members’ personal commitments. It could involve offering additional leave days or allowing team members to take leave at short notice.

    Workplace flexibility can take many different forms. By offering flexibility in the workplace, businesses can help their team members manage their personal and professional commitments, which can promote productivity, increase job satisfaction, and improve well-being.

    Contact our team to discover how you can incorporate workplace flexibility within your own business on 1800 868 254 or set up a meeting.

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Meet the Team: Rebecca O’Connell

Aug 22, 2023


  • 2min

Meet the Team: Rebecca O’Connell

Meet the Team
Total HRM team in August 2023. From L-R Amelie, Dave, Alison, Felicity, Kim, Linda, Rebecca, Sarah, Ashly and Caitlin.
We would like to introduce you to Rebecca O’Connell – our competitive and fun Operations Manager. Beck joined the team recently and has taken on various responsibilities, wearing many hats and getting straight down to business.

Beck’s HR journey started in a bit of a different way – as many of our careers tend to do. She worked as a People & Culture leader, managing people and making sure things ran smoothly, and as time went on, she found herself gravitating towards HR tasks more and more. She became an HR Business Partner at Albury City Council and was involved in the nitty-gritty of how HR works. She’s done everything from hiring the right people to keeping everything moving.

Rebecca O'Connell standing in front of the green trees outside Total HRM offices. Wearing a white coat and navy scarf.
Rebecca (Beck) O’Connell outside the Total HRM office.
Beck is now part of the Total HRM team bringing her A-grade game to the operations side. That means she’s juggling a lot of stuff, from managing schedules and setting up interviews, creating proposals, and hosting breakfasts to ensuring everything runs like clockwork. And she’s doing it all with a big smile and a can-do attitude.

Beyond the office, Beck’s passion for sports is hard to miss. You’ll find her on the netball court every weekend and watching more sports afterwards. Beck loves staying active and competitive – part of what makes her tick. Growing up, she would’ve loved to have played netball for Australia, but she is happy playing in Yackandandah.


Beck has been in the Albury/Wodonga region since she was a kid, with a short stint moving away to the city before returning in 2008. Beck loves everything about our region, especially as she raises her family here. Her favourite thing to do on the weekend is watching her kids play sports. She reasons that now that they’re older, watching and seeing them improve is what she loves. They’re not just a swarm of bees chasing a ball anymore!
You can usually find Beck around the weir with her family, at the local sports grounds, or at the pub watching the afternoon games with everyone. Did we mention she likes sport? Beck would love to get to Canada and explore the mountain regions, especially in the spring when you can hike and see the amazing views. She will also catch a couple of NBA and NHL games while she’s there.


Her willingness to tackle challenges head-on and make difficult decisions aligns with her philosophy of doing what’s right, not just what’s easy. It’s a philosophy that guides her, whether making tough decisions or facing hurdles head-on – which seamlessly fits in with our Total HRM approach.
Beck is a real asset to the team. Her diverse background, operational skills, and dedication to growth make her a standout in HR. We love having Beck’s energy in the office and her ability to keep us in line and move forward with a big smile.

You will see Beck around the office and at our events, so please introduce yourself if you bump into her. Beck is likely to be one of your first points of contact with Total HRM, so there’s no doubt all of you will speak to her soon!

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